24-Hour Movement Guidelines

The 24-Hour Movement Guidelines show Canadians how to live a healthy 24-hour day as it relates to physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep.  The benefits of following these Guidelines far exceed potential harms. Following these Guidelines may be challenging at times; progressing towards any of the Guideline targets will result in some health benefits.

 

These 24-Hour Movement Guidelines were informed by the best available evidence, expert consensus, stakeholder consultation, and consideration of values and preferences, applicability, feasibility, and equity. A glossary and more details on the Guidelines, the background research, their interpretation, guidance on how to achieve them, and recommendations for further research and surveillance are available at https://csep.ca/guidelines.  

24-HOUR MOVEMENT GUIDELINES FOR ADULTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adults Aged 65+ Years

Adults aged 65 years or older should:

  • Participate in a range of physical activities (e.g., weight bearing/non-weight bearing, sport and recreation) in a variety of environments (e.g., home/work/community; indoors/outdoors; land/water) and contexts (e.g., leisure, transportation, work, household) across all seasons.
  • Limit long periods of sedentary behaviours.
  • Practice healthy sleep hygiene (routines, behaviours, and environments conducive to sleeping well).

 

Following the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines is associated with these health benefits:

  • Lower risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, several cancers, anxiety, depression, dementia, weight gain, adverse blood lipid profile, falls and fall-related injuries.
  • Improved bone health, cognition, quality of life and physical function.

 

These Guidelines may not be appropriate for adults aged 65 years or older living with a disability or a medical condition; these individuals should consider consulting the Get Active Questionnaire, disability/condition-specific recommendations, or a health professional for guidance.

 The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults (65+ years)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Adults Aged 18-64 Years

Adults aged 18-64 years or older should:

  • Participate in a range of physical activities (e.g., weight bearing/non-weight bearing, sport and recreation) in a variety of environments (e.g., home/work/community; indoors/outdoors; land/water) and contexts (e.g., leisure, transportation, work, household) across all seasons.
  • Limit long periods of sedentary behaviours.
  • Practice healthy sleep hygiene (routines, behaviours, and environments conducive to sleeping well).

 

Following the 24-Hour Movement Guidelines is associated with these health benefits:

  • A lower risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, several cancers, anxiety, depression, dementia, weight gain, adverse blood lipid profile.
  • Improved bone health, cognition, quality of life and physical function.

 

These Guidelines may not be appropriate for adults aged 18-64 years who are pregnant or persons living with a disability or a medical condition; these individuals should consider consulting the Get Active Questionnaire, disability/condition-specific recommendations, or a health professional for guidance.

The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Adults (18-64 years)

 

 

 

 

Children and Youth 5-17 Years of Age

Children and Youth ages 5-17 years should:

Children and Youth

  • Participate in a range of physical activities in a variety of environments (e.g., home/school/community; indoors/outdoors; land/water; summer/winter) and contexts (e.g., play, recreation, sport, active transportation, hobbies, and chores).
  • Limit sedentary behaviours (especially screen time).
  • Practice healthy sleep hygiene (habits and practices that are conducive to sleeping well).

Following these 24-Hour Movement Guidelines is associated with these health benefits:

  • Better body composition, cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal fitness, academic achievement and cognition, emotional regulation, pro-social behaviours, cardiovascular and metabolic health, and overall quality of life.

These guidelines may be appropriate for children and youth with a disability or medical condition; however, a health professional should be consulted for additional guidance.

 

THE CANADIAN 24-HOUR MOVEMENT GUIDELINES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early Years-Infants (Less than 1), Toddlers (1-2 years), and Preschoolers (3-4 years)

Early Years- Infants (Less than 1), Toddlers (1-2 years), and preschoolers (3-4 years) Children in Early /years should:

  • Participate in a range of developmentally appropriate, enjoyable, and safe play-based and organized physical activities in a variety of environments (e.g., home/child care/school/community; indoors/outdoors; land/water; summer/winter), both independently as well as together with adults and other children. For infants, supervised activities could include tummy time, reaching and grasping, pushing and pulling, and crawling.
  • Limit sedentary behaviour and focus on quality activities, including interactive non-screen-based behaviours (e.g., reading, storytelling, singing, puzzles).
  • Develop healthy sleep hygiene in the early years; including having a calming bedtime routine with consistent bedtimes and wake-up times, avoiding screen time before sleep, and keeping screens out of the bedroom.

Following these 24-Hour Movement Guidelines is associated with these health benefits:

  • Better growth, cardiorespiratory and musculoskeletal fitness, cognitive development, psychosocial health/emotional regulation, motor development, body composition, quality of life/well-being, as well as reduced injuries.

These Guidelines may be appropriate for young children with a disability or medical condition; however, a health professional should be consulted for additional guidance.

THE CANADIAN 24-HOUR MOVEMENT GUIDELINES FOR the early years (0-4 years)

Colorectal Cancer

Facts about colorectal cancer and screening:

  • Screening helps prevent colorectal cancer.
  • Early detection and treatment saves lives.
  • Colorectal cancer screening should start at age 50.
  • Ontario has among the highest rates of colorectal cancer in the world. Colorectal cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer in Ontario, the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men and the third leading cause of cancer deaths in women.

 

Facts about Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT) Kits

  • They work by detecting microscopic blood that can come from colon polyps or early stage colorectal cancer
  • Done every two years, they can help find polyps and cancers early.
  • They are simlpe, done at home, and returned by mail.
  • If the FOBT is positive for blood you will be referred for a colonoscopy.
  • FOBT kits should be completed every two years starting at age 50.

 

Helpful tips and reminders about completing the FOBT kit:

  • Put the kit in the bathroom so it will be there when you need to use it.
  • Try to complete the kit within a week of receiving it.
  • Write the collection dates on each completed stool sample area.
  • Mail the completed kit as soon as possible; there are instructions on the kit indicating how soon the kit needs to be mailed after completing it.
  • Call the number on the kit if you have any problems.
  • Call your doctor's office if you have any other questions about FOBT or need a new kit.

Cervical Cancer

Facts about Papanicolaou (PAP) tests and screening:

  • A PAP test is a simple test that helps prevent cervical cancer by detecting cell changes that, if left untreated, can turn into cervical cancer.
  • Screening is the only way to detect the early changes that might lead to cervical cancer.
  • You should have PAP tests done beginning at age 21. If the results are normal, then you should have one done every three years. If the results are not normal, your physician will talk to you about what the results mean.
  • Early detection and treatment of cervical cancer saves lives.

 

How is a PAP test completed?

  • The cervix is at the top of the vagina. To do the test you will be asked to lie down and an instrument called a speculum is inserted into the vagina and opened to allow the cervix to be seen. The PAP test is then taken by using a small brush and read in a laboratory. PAP smears are not painful.

 

Helpful tips and reminders regarding booking your PAP test:

  • Your family physician will need to know the start date of your last menstrual cycle, if applicable, so keep this in mind when attending your appointment.

Breast Cancer

Facts about mammograms and screening:

  • A mammogram takes an X-ray picture of the breast and can find changes in the breast even when they are too small for you or your healthcare provider to feel or see.
  • Screening is the only way to detect the early changes that might suggest breast cancer.
  • You should have routine mammogram screening beginning at age 50 or sooner depending on your personal health history and your family history.
  • Depending on what is seen on the mammogram, more imaging or tests might be required. Most women who need more tests do not have breast cancer.
  • Early detection and treatment of breast cancer saves lives.

 

Why have a mammogram?

  • In Ontario, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer in women.
  • As women get older, the chance of getting breast cancer rises.
  • Mammograms can help to find small breast cancers before there are symptoms. If breast cancer is found at an early stage there is a high rate of successful treatment.

 

Helpful tips and reminders getting ready for your mammogram:

  • Most women’s breasts are tender the week before and after their period. Book your mammogram for a time when your breasts are not so tender.
  • Wear a two-piece outfit. You will be asked to remove your top.
  • Do not use deodorants, antiperspirants, body lotions, or talcum powders. Metals in these products can show up on the X-ray picture.